The Dawson Academy Blog

Dental Articles on Occlusion, Centric Relation, Restorative Dentistry & More

Dawson Quick Tips: Esthetic Restorations with Dental Implants

Welcome to Quick Tips. Today I want to give you some guidance when you are planning an esthetic restoration in the front of the mouth that's going to involve an implant.

What to look at first

When we look at these type of cases, the first thing we've got to be considering is the precision of that maxillary incisal edge. The second thing we have to think about is once we get that maxillary incisal edge figured out, where that gingival plane is going to be because that is going to be determining the optimum length of the tooth.

And then from there we have to think about how far that free gingival margin has to be from the head of the implant. Remember the incisal edge to free gingival margin really determines the length of the tooth.

Now we can plan the precise placement of the implant. We have our incisal edge position and we have our free gingival margin. We also know from the biology of implants that if the head of that implant can be about 3 millimeters from our free gingival margin, that gives us the room to be able to shape the tissue, support those papillas and have a great result.

So at the Dawson Academy, if you have an implant we still do everything the same way.

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Dawson Quick Tips: Customizing The Envelope of Function

Hello, everybody. Welcome to Quick Tips. In this edition, we're going to be talking about customizing your patient's envelope of function, which is a very important part of getting the anterior guidance right for your patients.

As you're looking at the lingual contour of provisional restorations, hopefully you are developing lines on your provisionals that provide evidence of posterior disclusion or anterior guidance.

Remember, if you don't get anterior guidance or posterior disclusion, then that is going to allow the back teeth to rub.

And if the back teeth rub, then we know that increases muscle activity and can create damage to the teeth, either by working them loose or by causing the teeth to wear. And make no mistake, a lot of the fractures we see are related to not having good anterior guidance or posterior disclusion.

But the question is, can we make the guidance too steep? 

When the patient starts chewing and speaking and the mandible starts moving outside-in, is it possible to get those lines too steep so it's actually in the way of the functional path that the lower incisors travel outside-in?

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