The Dawson Academy Blog

Dental Articles on Occlusion, Centric Relation, Restorative Dentistry & More

Why Do Patients Think Their Upper Anterior Teeth are Too Long?

Well, the short answer is probably because they are too long. They also might be too far out.

It’s important to remember that when you’re restoring maxillary anterior teeth, unless you give the laboratory very specific guidelines on where you want the maxillary incisal edge, their tendency is to make the teeth too long and to make them too far labially.The other thing that we have the tendency to do on maxillary anterior teeth is under-reduce, which sets up a lot of these problems.

One of the things that is extremely important to remember is that if all the lab has to go by is a nice model of the prepared teeth with good margins, they are simply guessing at where the maxillary incisal edges will be in space. We have to determine these things in the mouth and then give very specific communication to the lab on where that’s going to be, and then have some verification or protocols to make sure they do it.

Read More

How frequently (and under what circumstances) do you use your Doppler?

This video is an excerpt from the April 2015 Dawson Faculty Office Hours with Drs. Leonard Hess and Rajeev Upadya. To watch the full office hours and to sign up for future office hours, visit the Videos and Webinars page

The following is a transcription of this video excerpt. 

Lenny: In my practice the doppler is one of the most indespensable tools I use. Those of you that have heard me teach at The Academy have heard me say that if you took the doppler away from me, I wouldn't be able to practice the way I practice. What the doppler does for me is give me peace of mind.

Read More

How to Get a Patient to Accept Dental Treatment

Sometimes it’s hard to get patients to understand and accept the need for treatment.

The first thing to understand when it comes to patient acceptance is that patients won’t accept any course of treatment if they don’t understand that they have a problem. Particularly with equilibration it is important during the context of the examination that you first have a basic discussion about what optimum health is.

Read More

The Process for Occlusal Splint Therapy

This video is an excerpt from the April 2015 Dawson Faculty Office Hours with Drs. Leonard Hess and Rajeev Upadya. To watch the full office hours and to sign up for future office hours, visit the Videos and Webinars page

The following is a transcription of this video excerpt. 

Question: Describe your process for splint therapy

Dr. Leonard Hess: Ok that's a great question. If we have somebody we are suspecting has an intercapsular issue, which would be a medial pole issue, then we place them in a full-coverage orthotic splint (an SRS splint) so that we are meeting the requirements of occlusal stability; we are getting even contact, canine guidance and protrusive guidance.  That patient will go into splint therapy where we monitor them on a regular basis to see if the splint needs to be adjusted. As the joint becomes healthier, the splint almost becomes a bandaid. As we adjust it, we should see the joint to start to seat into the fossae again completely. We should be able to nurture the joint back into good health.

Read More