The Dawson Academy Blog

Dental Articles on Occlusion, Centric Relation, Restorative Dentistry & More

Integrating Airway Disorders into Treatment

So as we move into the future of complete dentistry, we're going to be finding that we will be doing more and more integration of airway disorders into our treatment planning and even into solving occlusal problems.

So for example, when someone's evaluated and we are able to identify that they have a breathing disorder or an airway disorder, we recognize that part of their airway disorder may be that they're now a mouth breather. As a result of that, their tongue remains low in the floor of their mouth, and as a result of that, their maxillary arch is not developed and they have crowding of the maxillary and maybe the mandibular arches.

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How to introduce photography into your practice (and why)

Digital photography is an integral part of my diagnosis and treatment planning. It is also an integral part of The Dawson Academy philosophy. Knowing how to introduce digital photography to your team will ensure that they will know how to properly take photos that can be used during the diagnosis and treatment planning stage.

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Why the uppermost position is physiologically correct

Why is the physiologically correct position in centric relation the most superior position in the joint space itself?

Now, if you're like me and you went through dental school earlier, maybe 20 years ago, you were probably taught that centric relation was actually a distalized position of the condyles.

It was a very frustrating experience not only for the dentist, but also for the patients because you're trying to put the mandible and the condyle into a very unnatural position.

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Quiz: Are you practicing the way you always envisioned?

Started by Dr. Peter Dawson, The Dawson Academy has been teaching for decades the importance of understanding occlusion in order to provide patients with predictable, functional, and long-lasting care. However the Dawson Academy Philosophy of Compete Care Dentistry not only allows dentists to provide better care to patients, but allows them to spend more time outside the office doing what is most important to them.

Is your work-life balance up to par with what you envisioned? Are you overall satisfied with your career?

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How can the position of teeth affect function?

How can the position of teeth affect function? I almost want to approach that backwards and say, "How can the position of teeth NOT affect function?"

The position of teeth is important for speaking and for enunciating sounds like our S sounds or F sounds.

The incisal edge determines how we enunciate. The incisal edge position dictates where the teeth hit on the lower lip so we can enunciate an F sound properly. If the teeth are too far apart or bumping into each other, you cannot make the F or S sounds properly, like the little kid who's lost his front teeth and wants them for Christmas. The position of the teeth affect not only our speaking, but it affects how we chew.

The position of teeth affects how we swallow and breathe.

The position of the teeth erupt into the mouth in the neutral zone, in the corridor that is dictated by the inward and outward functions of the muscles and the tongue.

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How Do I Predictably Prep Second Molars?

When delivering a single crown, probably the toughest tooth we can prep for is the second molar.

There are a couple things to be aware of when prepping second molars:

1. Limited Opening

One, usually, there's a limited opening in that area, so when you are prepping the tooth, you have to give the patient breaks because you're going to have to ask them to open quite a bit.

2. Wear and Tight Neutral Zone

The second thing, which is more of a concern, is the wear in that area and also the tight neutral zone.

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