The Dawson Academy Blog

Dental Articles on Occlusion, Centric Relation, Restorative Dentistry & More

How Splints Fit Into a Treatment Plan

Hi, everybody. My name's Dr. Leonard Hess. I'm one of the senior faculty members here at the Dawson Academy, and I'd like to spend a few minutes talking with you about where occlusal splints work into a treatment plan when we're talking about doing larger or more complicated treatment plans. Let's really take a moment and break our splints down into two predominant types of appliances.

Read More

Lucia Jig or Leaf Gauge?

Lucia Jig or a Leaf Gauge? Which one is best? A couple of tools that have been used throughout the years to aid dentists in seeding the condyles and taking or recording a centric relation bite record in addition to bimanual manipulation or in conjunction with bimanual manipulation are the Lucia Jig and the Leaf Gauge.

Read More

Tongue Ties, Restricted Fascia and Mouth Breathing

Consequences of these conditions explained by a leading expert, physician and researcher in nasal obstruction, snoring and sleep disordered breathing.

Soroush Zaghi, MD, graduated from Harvard Medical School, completed residency in ENT (Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery) at UCLA, and Sleep Surgery Fellowship at Stanford University. He is active in clinical research with over 60+ peer-reviewed research publications in the fields of neuroscience, head and neck surgery, and sleep-disordered breathing. He recently spoke with Kelley Richardson, our Dawson Academy Airway Curriculum Liaison, to discuss how tongue ties, restricted fascia and mouth breathing can negatively affect sleep, breathing, growth and development.

Read More

Turn hygiene into you 'bird dog'

The most important role of hygienist is actually to be an advocate towards the patient, for the patient but also for the dentist. Our job as a hygienist is to be the bird dog or to find any instability that's going on in the mouth because we're in there so often, every three or six months. If we have really great records, we can keep a running tab on the problems in their mouth or the instabilities.

Read More

Why should dentistry focus on airway disorders?

Treating airway disorders is important because it is our primary physiologic function, we can’t go without air for very long! It takes about 3 minutes or so without air to start a cascade of events brought on by our automatic/autonomic nervous system to keep us alive. It’s the sympathetic response commonly known as the “fight or flight response” that kicks in to keep us alive. These responses include an increase in heart rate to get oxygen in the blood to all the organs in the body. The most important organ, being the brain, aka the command center, which will continue to keep us alive. Opening and keeping our airway open should be on the forefront of every Complete Exam.

Read More