The Dawson Academy Blog

Dental Articles on Occlusion, Centric Relation, Restorative Dentistry & More

Airway and Dawson Dentistry through the eyes of an Orthodontist

Dr. Richard Roblee is an airway-focused orthodontist that practices in Fayetteville, AR. Dr. Roblee is one of our featured speakers at the 2020 International Airway Symposium. He is also the author of Interdisciplinary Dentofacial Therapy: A comprehensive Approach to Optimal Patient Care. Kelley Richardson, our Airway Curriculum Liaison, sat down with him to discuss his interdisciplinary approach and how Dr. Peter Dawson helped shape his overall philosophy.

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Webinar: Airway Orthodontics-An Introduction to the New Paradigm

Dr. Barry Raphael discuss how many of our dental school and residency orthodoxies are now very different than what was taught. He'll turn your thinking about Sleep Dentistry around, too. Traditionally, in orthodontics we align the teeth first, set the occlusion, get the jaws to balance and match the joints, hope the muscles will follow the form, and see about the airway last (if at all).

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The correlation between bruxism and airway disorders

One of the things that really keyed us into the fact that airway and breathing disorders are very significant is that we began to see some things from studies that were done overnight that showed that it's very common for patients that have, let's say, sleep apnea, to have an apneic event, and at the end of that event, to have a bruxism episode.

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Integrating Airway Disorders into Treatment

So as we move into the future of complete dentistry, we're going to be finding that we will be doing more and more integration of airway disorders into our treatment planning and even into solving occlusal problems.

So for example, when someone's evaluated and we are able to identify that they have a breathing disorder or an airway disorder, we recognize that part of their airway disorder may be that they're now a mouth breather. As a result of that, their tongue remains low in the floor of their mouth, and as a result of that, their maxillary arch is not developed and they have crowding of the maxillary and maybe the mandibular arches.

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